TRANSITION PLANNING TIPS SHEETS

This page offers information on important life transitions, as well as tips and resources to help you plan in preparation for them.

What is transition planning?

Service Coordination Support (SCS) wants to help you better prepare for life’s transitions. A transition is when a person experiences or makes a change in their life, such as starting or leaving school, learning a new skill, getting a job or finding a place to live.

We recognize that everyone experiences transitions at different times in their lives. Change can be exciting and challenging for many people. Transition planning involves looking ahead and planning for the future of your choice.

Making a plan gives you a chance to tell people what’s important to you, your strengths, abilities, your support needs and how you want to be supported. SCS can support you in planning for your life transitions, identify opportunities that are available to you in your community and help you reach your goals.

Read on for more information on each transition period, as well as tips and resources to help you plan in preparation for them.

My Search Tool

We have put together examples of resources in our tip sheets to help you plan for each transition period.

For more information, we invite you to visit My Search Tool, an online library of local resources and services for children and adults with developmental disabilities or autism. You can search by topic, location, age, or distance from your home.

LinkYou can access My Search Tool at search.scsonline.ca.

Disclaimer

SCS assumes no liability or responsibility for any errors or omission in the content contained in this document.

Questions?

Please visit scsonline.ca or contact us at 613-748-1788 for more information.

Transition Period: Living On Your Own

Link Download this section in PDF format. You can save it on your computer and print it if necessary.

Finding a place to live is an important decision and it requires planning. It is important for you to think how you want to be supported, what skills you need to learn, and who you would like to help you. You will need to explore things such as; what housing options are available, what supports you can receive, and what funding may be available.

TIPS

Building Your Network

Is there someone you enjoy spending time with who you think would be a good roommate? Having a roommate can be helpful; you can share the expenses such as groceries and rent, as well as share responsibilities such as chores and errands.

Have you considered visiting your local community center to see what services are offered in your local community to help you live independently? Visit this link to locate the nearest community resource center in your area:

Link Locate the nearest community resource center in your area

Did you know that the respiteservices.com Ottawa Program can help you find Direct Support Workers who can help you learn independent living skills and home management skills? For example, they can help you learn how to cook, budget, do laundry, etc.

Link respiteservices.com in Ottawa

Defeat loneliness and boredom with a ‘Virtual Circle’ of Friends! Learn the step-by-step process to create a ‘Virtual Circle’ of friends with this FREE Training.

Link Virtual Circle

Financial Assistance and Planning

You may be eligible for the ODSP moving expenses. You can call your ODSP worker to ask about eligible payments to cover the cost of moving, household furniture and personal items. ODSP offers:

  • Financial assistance to help you with essential living expenses
  • Benefits, including prescription drugs and vision care

Are you interested in planning for your future? P4P Planning Network offers free resources and tools designed to empower people with disabilities and their caregivers to create meaningful lives, including financial planning.

Other

Have you thought of where you want to live? Thinking about the services you use, where your family and friends live can help you decide on a good location for you. Living near people and services that are important to you may help you feel more comfortable in your community.

Do you have an emergency safety plan? Your safety plan should include information about who you can call for help and where to go during an emergency.

Suggested Resources

Link Families Matter Coop

Link ODSP

Link Ottawa Carleton Lifeskills (OCL)

Link Innovative Community Support Services (ICSS)

Link DSW Cooperative

Link Ottawa Carleton Association for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OCAPDD)

Link Y’s Owl Maclure

Link LiveWorkPlay

Link respiteservices.com

Link Rec Respite

Link SparksCare

Link P4P Planning Network

Transition Period: High School Graduation

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Transition planning for post high school graduation is very important and it’s best to start planning early!

Transition planning involves looking ahead and planning for the future of your choice. Transition planning is part of your Individualized Education Program (IEP) through your high school. The planning process involves you, your support circle and your teachers.  Transition planning can help you:

  • Decide where and how you want to live
  • Decide what you want to do for employment, volunteer work or day programming
  • Identify what your skills are and what you will need to work on
  • Understand what services and supports you will need
  • Learn how to find and use community resources
  • Identify who you want to help you

Start transition planning discussions early with your school, between 14-16 years old. This includes talking about what you want to do after graduation, what skills you will need to learn to be as independent as possible, who you want to spend your time with, and what services will be available once you turn 18, etc.

Transition planning gives you a chance to review your strengths, abilities, skills, current resources and supports. Building your transition plan on your strengths will help for a more successful plan!

TIPS

Financial Assistance and Planning

Did you know that you could apply to Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) 6 months before your 18th birthday? It is actually recommended as the application process can take up to 6 months.

Did you know that adult Passport funding could be used for day programming supports, respite, hiring a job coach, etc.?

Are you interested in planning for your child’s future?

P4P Planning Network offers free resources and tools designed to empower people with disabilities and their caregivers to create meaningful lives.

Link P4P Planning Network

Building Your Network

Did you know that you must apply to Developmental Services Ontario Eastern Region (DSOER) to see if you are eligible for adult developmental services funded by the Ministry? You can start the application process early and apply at age 16. DSOER will confirm your eligibility for adult developmental services at age 16, however, the services will not start until age 18.

Have you considered visiting your local community resource center to see what services are offered in your local community to help you meet new people and build your social network? Visit this link to locate the nearest community resource center in your area:

Link Locate the nearest community resource center in your area

Did you know that the respiteservices.com Ottawa Program can help you find Direct Support Workers who can help you learn life skills?

Link respiteservices.com Ottawa Program

Are you a student between 14-21 years old interested in exploring ideas for your future after high school?  Student Links matches students and mentors who share a common passion or interest. This is achieved by connecting young people with adult mentors or community connections where similar interests exist.

Link Student Links

Other

Have you thought about what you would like to do when you finish school? There are so many options to consider: going to college or university, finding a job, attending a day program or recreational program, staying at home, etc. Matching your skills, interests and what is important to you will help increase your success and happiness! Think about what makes a good day for you and how you can include these activities into your weekly routine post-graduation (i.e. swimming, bowling, getting together with friends, visiting the library, etc.).

There are person-centred tools that can help you gather important information to help you make decisions about your future plans. Please contact SCS for more information.

Suggested Resources

Link Families Matter Coop

Link ODSP Employment Supports

Link Student Links

Link respiteservices.com

Link Developmental Service Ontario Eastern Region

Link Y’s Owl MacLure

Link P4P Planning Network

Link Passport Funding Tip Sheet

Transition Planning Tools:

  1. Link SCS Community Options Package
  1. Link SCS Transition planning FAQ
  1. Link SCS Transition planning guide
  1. Link Autism Speaks Transition Tool Kit

Transition Period: Pre-Diagnosis to Post-Diagnosis

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Pre-diagnosis to post-diagnosis is the period of time before, during and after a child undergoes a diagnostic assessment. A diagnostic assessment is a specialized process where the goal is to learn more about a child’s developmental profile. Through this process parents will learn more about their child’s developmental strengths and needs in areas such as: speech and language, motor skills, play, social skills, behavior, and early learning. A diagnostic assessment may result in your child receiving a developmental diagnosis. This can be a stressful time for families, there are services available to help support you.

TIPS

Financial Assistance

Did you know you could apply for the Child Disability Tax Credit (DTC)? A child is eligible for the DTC when a medical practitioner certifies that the child has a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions. There is a specific form that the doctor must complete and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) would need to approve the form. You can send the form to the CRA at any time during the year.

Have you applied for the Child Disability Benefit (CDB)? This financial benefit is income based and provides a monthly payment. To apply for this program, you must have a signed Disability Tax Credit Certificate as well as a completed Canada Child Tax Benefit application form (RC66).

The Trillium Drug Program offered by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care provides medication coverage for Ontario residents with a valid Ontario Health card. For more information, visit ontario.ca. In the Quick search box, type “child Trillium Drug Program”.

Did you know that a Service Navigator from Autism Ontario could help you better understand the Ontario Autism Program (OAP) funding and service options? They can help you explore available services that you can purchase with your OAP allocated funding.

Families who are caring for a child with a developmental and/or physical disability can apply to the Special Services at Home program to get funding for primary caregiver relief (respite), for activities of personal growth or development including camps and recreational activities, such as swimming and music classes. We invite you to visit our website to view our Special Services at Home (SSAH) instructional video if you need guidance with completing your SSAH funding application.

Link Special Services at Home (SSAH) instructional video

Your child may be eligible for the monthly Assistance for Children with Severe Disability Program (ACSD). This is a Ministry funded income based program. We invite you to visit our website to view our instructional video if you need guidance with completing your ACSD funding application.

Link ACSD funding application instructional video

If you need financial assistance to cover the cost of incontinence supplies, including diapers, consider applying for the Easter Seals Incontinence Grant Program for support.

Have you heard about the Assistive Devices Program (ADP)? The program’s objective is to provide consumer-centred support and funding to eligible Ontario residents who have long-term physical disabilities and to provide access to personalized assistive devices.

Do you know about the Autism Ontario One to One Summer Support Reimbursement fund? Parents with children diagnosed with Autism are eligible to apply for this draw each year.

Financial Planning

There are resources that can help you plan for your child’s future:

  • Henson trust
  • Registered Disability Savings Plan
  • Registered Education Savings Plan
  • Critical Illness Insurance

Are you interested in planning for your child’s future? P4P Planning Network offers free resources and tools designed to empower people with disabilities and their caregivers to create meaningful lives.

Link P4P Planning Network

Building your Network

Have you thought of connecting with other parents? Parent and Sibling support groups are available in your community!

Do you have a family doctor who can follow your child’s health care needs?  If you are searching for a doctor, The Ottawa Public health can help you find one:

Link Ottawa Public health

Have you considered sharing your diagnostic information with your child’s care provider or school? They may be better able to support your child if they better understand child’s needs, strengths and interests.

Do you need help to understand your child’s new diagnosis? CHEO Children’s Treatment Center offers social work support for families who receive a new diagnosis. They also have an on call/drop in social work service available on Wednesdays.

Have you considered visiting your local community resource center to see what services are offered in your local community that can help your family?  Visit this link to locate the nearest community resource center in your area:

Link Locate the nearest community resource center in your area

Did you know that Quick Start offers free short term Intensive Behavioural Intervention (IBI) for children under the ages of 24 months? They also offer a respite program and free workshops for families.

Link Quick Start

Did you know that there is a directory of services that specialize in supporting children and adults with ASD?

Link Directory of services for children and adults with ASD

Did you know that the respiteservices.com Ottawa Program can help you find Direct Support Workers?

Link respiteservices.com in Ottawa

Have you considered becoming a member of Children At Risk? Children At Risk provides services, camps and programs for families of children diagnosed with autism.

Autism Ontario Service Navigators are available to provide information about the Ontario Autism Program (OAP) and help connect families with service providers and resources available in their local communities.

Planning for Childcare & School Registration

Are you looking for day care, before or after school care? Consider registering with the City of Ottawa Child Care Registry. Contact the program directly to see if you are eligible for a subsidized spot.

If your child is under 12 years of age and requires support in a registered childcare setting, you can connect with Children’s Inclusion Support Services (CISS) for support.

Contact your local school in the spring to register your child for the next school year.

Other

The Kaitlin Atkinson Family Resource Library at CHEO is a specialized library that offer materials on children’s health, illness and injury, and parenting. It is free and open to the public.

Suggested Resources

Link CHEO Diagnostic Assessment Services

Link Canada Child Disability Credit

Link Critical Illness Insurance

Link Critical Illness Insurance coverage for those with ASD

Link Child Disability Benefit

Link CHEO Access Team

Link Ontario Autism Program

Link Ottawa Children Treatment Center

Link Autism Ontario

Link Autism Ontario Ottawa Chapter

Link Assistance for Children with Severe Disability Funding program (ACSD)

Link SSAH

Link Trillium Drug Program

Link Easter Seals Incontinence Grant

Link Children’s Inclusion Support Services

Link respiteservices.com in Ottawa

Link SCS Resource List

Link Quickstart

Link Canada’s Online ASD Directory

Link Building Blocks

Link TIPES

Link Portia Learning Center

Link P4P Planning Network

Link Emerging Minds

Link ABA Connections

Link Children at Risk

Link Trillium Foundation program
(in the quick search box, type “Trillium Drug Program”)

Link SSAH instructional video

The Kaitlin Atkinson Family Resource Library at CHEO
Telephone Number 613-737-7600 ext. 3942
Link The Kaitlin Atkinson Family Resource Library at CHEO

The Andrew Fleck Family Resources Library
Telephone Number 613-737-3716
Link The Andrew Fleck Family Resources Library

Link The Assistive Devices Program (ADP)

Link Easter Seals Incontinence Grant

Link Children’s Integration Support Services

Transition Period: Employment or Volunteer Opportunities

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If finding work or a volunteer opportunity is important to you, there are services available to help you find the right option! Employment support programs can help you identify your work interests, assess your employment skills and training needs. You can also get help with preparing your resume, searching for jobs opportunities and getting ready for interviews. Some programs can help you learn new employment skills, such as cooking, cleaning, woodworking, office skills, etc. Other programs can help you prepare for job placements, provide job coaching and volunteer opportunities.

TIPS

Finding Employment Opportunities

Did you know that ODSP has a Supported Employment Program? This program can help you with your job search, the interview process and training for your new job.

Have you considered contacting respiteservices.com to hire a job coach, someone who can support you while you receive training for your new job?

Link respiteservices.com in Ottawa

Have you considered visiting your local community resource center to see what services are offered in your local community to support you with your search for a work or volunteer opportunity? Visit this link to locate the nearest community resource center in your area:

Link Locate the nearest community resource center in your area

Are you a student between 14-21 years old interested in exploring ideas for your future after high school? Student Links matches students with mentors who share a common passion or interest. To do this, youth are connected with adult mentors or community connections where similar interests exist.

Link Student Links

Building Your Skills

Have you thought of what type of paid work or volunteer work you would like to do? Matching your skills, interests and what is important to you will increase your success and happiness at work!

Ask your teachers if you are eligible to participate in Co-op opportunities or job readiness programs at your school. This can help you learn new skills that will prepare you for future work and volunteer opportunities.

Did you know there are companies that offer Co-op opportunities to learn new skills, even after you graduate?

Other

Creating a One Page Profile to attach to your resume is a great way to help the employer or volunteer organization get to know you better and understand how to best support you! SCS can help you develop your One Page Profile.

Think about how you will get to and from your work or volunteer location. Will you need someone to accompany you, can you walk or take the bus there?

Financial Assistance and Planning

The Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Employment Supports can help you get prepare for work and find a job that is right for you. Did you know that you could work part-time and still receive ODSP? Contact your ODSP worker for more information.

Link Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) Employment Supports

Did you know that your Passport or SSAH Funding can be used to hire a support person or job coach? A job coach can help you look for work, with skill development, prepare for an interview and with training for your new job. We invite you to visit our website to view our Special Services at Home (SSAH) instructional video if you need guidance with completing your SSAH funding application.

Link SSAH funding application instructional video

Are you interested in planning for your future? P4P Planning Network offers free resources and tools designed to empower people with disabilities and their caregivers to create meaningful lives.

Link P4P Planning Network

Suggested Resources

Link ODSP Employment Supports

Link Y’s Owl MacLure

Link ICSS Employment Solutions

Link Christian Horizon’s-Grow Studio’s & Capable Employment Services

Link Causeway Work Center

Link Volunteer Ottawa

Link Ottawa Carleton Life skills

Link Student Links

Link P4P Planning Network

Link Adaptive Learning Program (ALP)

Link Algonquin AAADD program

Link Eat More Soup

Link Community Laundry Co-op

Link Gourmet Express

Link Ottawa Mission Food Services Training Program

Transition Period: Relationships

Link Download this section in PDF format. You can save it on your computer and print it if necessary.

Having meaningful relationships can help you feel happier and healthier. Building your social network can also help you get the support you need when you need it. Here are some tips to help you develop new relationships.

TIPS

Finding Opportunities to Meet New People

Have you considered connecting with local youth groups or drop in social groups in your community? There are groups where you can do activities and meet individuals that have similar interests as you. These can be great opportunities to meet others living near you!

Link connect with local youth groups

Are you familiar with ASD Central? It is an online Facebook platform moderated by people with ASD.

Link ASD Central

Did you know that there are online apps available to help differently abled women and men find love, friendship and support in an online dating environment?  Here are some tips to consider offered by Easter Seals:

Link Easter Seals

Student Links matches students aged 14-21 with mentors who share a common passion or interest. This is a great opportunity to build community connections where similar interests exist, while exploring future employment opportunities.

Did you know that ABLE2 has a volunteer matching program? You can register and request to be matched with someone who has the same interests as you, someone to visit and do activities with.

Link ABLE2 volunteer matching program

Suggested Resources

Link Student Links

Link Teaching Sexual Health

Link Planned Parenthood

Social Skills and Lifeskills programs

Link LiveWorkPlay: Friday Night Fun!

Link ABLE2 – Dovercourt Dances

Link Ottawa Independent Learning Resource Center (OILRC)

Link The SPACE-Games Night

Link Online Dating When You Have a Disability Online Dating When You Have a Disability

Transition Period: Changing Schools

Link Download this section in PDF format. You can save it on your computer and print it if necessary.

Changing schools can be a difficult transition for a student.  The idea of having new teachers, classes and friends can be a scary time for a child or youth. There are things you can do to help plan for a smooth transition to their new learning environment and a successful school year.

TIPS

Identification and Placement of Exceptional Pupils (IPRC) and Integrated Educational Plan (IEP)

Did you know that every child identified with special needs should have an Identification and Placement of Exceptional Pupils (IPRC) and an Integrated Educational Plan (IEP) completed by the school? You can request an IEP when your child enters Elementary School. The school is responsible to schedule an IEP meeting. As a parent, you should receive an invitation to attend this IEP meeting.

Your child’s individualized transition plan should be shared with you. Ensure that your child’s IEP is shared with the new school so that they have the information they need to best support your child in their new class.

Other

Have you thought about setting up times for you and your child to visit their new school, meet their teachers and see their class room? This can be helpful in making the student feel more comfortable on their first day of school.

Consider completing a One Page Profile (person-centred tool) with your child and giving a copy to their teacher. The One Page Profile can help the school to get to know your child and better understand how to support them. SCS can support you in developing your child’s One Page Profile.

Did you know that once your child starts elementary school, Speech and Language therapy as well as Occupational Therapy may be offered at school? If you think your child would benefit from such therapies, talk to your school and request that the they submit the referral for consideration.

Suggested Resources

Link Andrew Fleck Children’s Services

Link Our Schools – Ottawa-Carleton District School Board

Link School Locator Tool

Link Conseil des écoles catholiques du Centre-Est (CECCE)

Link The Ottawa Catholic School Board (OCSB)

Link Conseil des écoles publiques de l’Est de l’Ontario (CEPEO)

Link The Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (gov.on.ca)

Link The Individual Education Plan Process (gov.on.ca)

Transition Period: Pre-Planning Final Arrangements

Link Download this section in PDF format. You can save it on your computer and print it if necessary.

Talking about end of life planning is never easy, but being prepared can give you peace of mind and can provide some relief to your loved ones. You should have legal documents ready. If you are a caregiver, here are some steps to take when someone you care for passes away.

TIPS

Preparing Your Will

A Will identifies who receives your possessions after you pass away. It is recommended to have a Will or Power of Attorney before you need them, as you must be capable of making such decisions when completing the process. Have you thought about preparing a Will or having someone you trust be identified as your Power of Attorney?

Did you know that a Power of Attorney allows another person to make decisions on your behalf while you are alive? There are two kinds of Power of Attorney that you can identify: Power of Attorney for your property and Power of Attorney of your personal care.

When a Loved One Passes Away

Losing a loved one is a difficult time. Below is some information that can help you:

  • Did you know that a funeral director is able to guide you through all the necessary arrangements? The funeral director could help you with completing the death registration, burial permit or cremation process.
  • Did you know that you can only obtain a death certificate once the individual’s death has been registered? Two documents will be required for the death registration: the Medical Certificate of Death and the Statement of Death.
  • Don’t forget to notify any services, mail, groups, parking permits, driver’s license, house insurance etc. that the individual has passed away.

Suggested Resources

Link What to do when someone dies

Link How Powers of Attorney work

Link Mental incapacity

Link Wills, Estate & Trusts

Link Capacity Assessments

Link Social Services | Basic Funerals

Transition Period: Retirement

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Retirement is an exciting new chapter in our lives. You might wonder: how can I stay active during retirement? Are you planning for your retirement or a loved one’s retirement? Here are some helpful tips that may makes transitioning into retirement easier.

TIPS

Recreational and Leisure Activities

You may want to explore the city and community programs to find recreational and leisure activities for older adults and seniors. Here are some options to explore, including but not limited to:

  • City of Ottawa Recreation Guide
  • Clubs that promote group activies (walking group, book club, tennis club, curling club, knitting club, etc.)
  • Your public library

Budget and Funding

You may want to consider learning about or receiving help with creating and following a budget for your retirement years. Your budget for retirement will be different from your budget when you were working. For example, you may spend less money on commuting to work and you may want to spend money on traveling.

  • At age 60 or older, you may be eligible for funding. Some examples of funding are:
  • Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension
  • Post retirement benefit
  • Old Age Security Allowance (OAS)
  • Old Age Security Allowance for the Survivor
  • Old Age Security pension
  • Guaranteed Income Supplement

Are you under the age of 65 and been diagnosed with a disability? If so, you might be eligible to apply for the Canadian Pension Plan Disability Benefit.

Did you know that if you have children and your spouse or common law partner passed away you could also be eligible for the Canada Pension Plan Benefits (CPP)? Some of the CPP benefits that you may be eligible for:

  • CPP children’s benefit
  • CPP death benefit
  • Allowance for the Survivor
  • If yourself or a loved one you are caring for is 65 years of age or older they could be eligible for:
  • CPP retirement pension
  • Post-Retirement Benefit (PRB)

Suggested Resources

Link City of Ottawa recreational activities for seniors

Link Champlain LHIN long term care homes

Link The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension

Link The Canadian Pension Plan disability benefit

Link Canada Pension Plan (CPP) death benefit

Link Canada Pension Plan (CPP) children’s benefits

Link Allowance for the Survivor

Link Canada Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension

Link Post-Retirement Benefit (PRB)

Link Canada Pension Plan (CPP) survivor’s pension

Transition Period: Getting Married

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Marriage is a recognized union between two people. It establishes rights and obligations between them, as well as between them and their children. Wedding planning can be exciting and lots of fun! If you are planning to get married, here are some things to think about.

TIPS

Are You Thinking of Getting Married?

If you are thinking of getting married in Ontario, here is some important information to consider while you plan for your wedding.

  • Did you know that in Ontario, you must be 16 years or older to get married? If you wish to get married before the age of 18, you will require consent from both of your parents or guardians.
  • You can get your marriage license at any Service Ontario Bureau. Then you must go to your local municipal office where you can buy your marriage license.
  • When you apply for your marriage license, remember that each person will have to bring 2 pieces of government-issued identification. A marriage license is only valid for 90 days.
  • Once you are married, you will be able to get a marriage certificate. Be sure to ask the person officiating the wedding if they will send your marriage license to Service Ontario, as this how you will obtain your marriage certificate.
  • If you wish to legally change your last name after you get married, this process can be done directly with Service Ontario.

Suggested Resources

Link Getting married | Ontario.ca

Link Ontario Marriage FAQs